Tag Archives: Cycling

Grabbing A Quickie


So yesterday was warm enough for me to take my first bike ride of 2014 and it was glorious!  Only about 13 miles and it took me an hour and a half, because you know I couldn’t just ride – I had to stop and take pictures and smile.  I smiled a lot.  Like, pretty constantly.  The sun was shining, I was riding in my new neighborhood, my bike was freshly tuned, and the wind was in my hair.  Well, not really.  I had on a skull cap and a helmet.  But had my hair been free, the wind would have been ruffling it to Wind Blown Surfer Look.

Not to change the subject, but do you know how hard it is to concentrate when small, pain in the ass dogs are barking at you?  Just an observation.

Now for your entertainment, photos from my ride:

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First, my baby!  All tuned up and ready to roll.  For those of you new to my biking fetish, this is my Cannondale Quik – hence the reference in my title.  Fooled ya, didn’t I?

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What’s this?  Something green!!!  No clue what it is, exactly, but anything green is welcome at this point.  Taken along Nicolet Drive.

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One of the coolest things about where I live now is that I am a mere 5 minutes from the Bay.  I stopped here, because I thought it was a rest stop.  Turns out it was actually someone’s front porch.  If you look over the fence, you see the house at the base of the drop off, on the shoreline.  Pretty cool and great view.  Can’t imagine hauling groceries down every week though.

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Another view of the frozen Bay from the mystery front porch.

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Did I mention I am only 5 minutes from the Bay?  I LOVE IT!  Okay, this was from the boat landing off Point Pleasant.  “Boat Landing” is a generous description, seeing as there is no actual place to back up a trailer, but I am sure we can use it for our kayaks.  There’s another one close to Cousin Jeremy’s – I threatened to leave our kayaks at his house and he didn’t even bat an eyelash.  COME ON WARM WEATHER!  I’m hyperventilating here.

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Water is running like crazy all over.  This is the bottom portion of Wequiock Creek, I am pretty sure.

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And this would be the top of Wequiock Creek, before it tumbles over the Niagra Escarpment.  You see me using my big geological words, like I actually know my shit?  Gotta love the internet.  And now for the big finale….

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Wequiock Falls!  I think in the summer this is down to a trickle, but in the spring when the snow is melting, it draws a lot of activity.  Located off of Hwy 57, near the Jean Nicolet statue, in case you wanna take a drive by this weekend.  You can stop at the Settlement and get some fish when you’re done.

Here are a few more images:

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There is a set of stairs you can take that will bring you down to the creek – I was wearing biking shoes, so didn’t venture too far past the lowest level.  Having metal clips on the bottom makes poor traction on rocks, and I didn’t want them packed with mud either.  Plus, I found out water easily seeps up the bottom of my shoes, so I ended up pedaling home with wet socks.  Totally worth it, though.

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No, I did not venture into the area unmaintained by park staff.  My normally adventuresome nature didn’t want to fall in the creek.

And in case you were wondering who loves Allie….

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Linda!  Duh!

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Wequiock Creek after it goes thru the culvert.  It then winds thru the woods until it gets to Nicolet Drive – which was the first picture in the series.

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My first of many decent hill climbs this year.  This is VanLanen Road, and I took it up from Nicolet to the Falls.  The good thing was that I got to go back down it.  What goes up, must come down, thank goodness.  You can see the Bay in the distance.

And that’s it, my friends.  I’ll see you Thursday with a house tour.

Sue

 

 

 

 

 

Final Photos of 2013


It’s that time again!  Time to see what’s been going on since my last photo entry.  It has been a busy 6 weeks with Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations.  And snow.  Lots and lots of snow.  Which means lots and lots of shoveling.  I haven’t broken out the snow shoes yet, but that will be coming this weekend.

Enjoy the photos – next week I will be back with plans for 2014!

First off – The Avett Brothers with Dawn!

My last bike ride of the year.  I think this was the weekend before Thanksgiving, and after our first or second dusting of snow.  It was a beautiful fall day and not too windy.  Perfect for cruising down the Fox River Trail.

Fox River Trail

Chilly!!

Then this happened….thankfully only a warning for this lead foot.

Uh-oh....

Uh-oh….

With the unseasonal below zero cold, fat cat is starting early with his laying in front of the fire-place.

Midnight

Look at me! Look at my awesomeness! Do not turn away! Look! LOOK!!!

And the dogs still get walked – even in 2 degree weather!  And yes, it really was 2 degrees this day.

Lucky and Daisy

HURRY UP MOM!!!! WE’RE FREEZING!

The tree went up.  We were looking for this guy to warm things up, but the Cold Miser is winning this year.

Heat Miser

Where are my minions???

On the 14th, me and a couple of friends (Dawn and Debbie) went thru the Botanical Gardens Garden Of Lights.  Beautiful as usual.

Me, Dawn, and Debbie.

Me, Dawn, and Debbie.

Garden of Lights

The Big Tree!

Garden of Lights

Garden of Lights

Dawn under her tiara!

 

Garden of Lights

Warming up by the fire

Garden of Lights

Garden of Lights

Garden of Lights

Garden of Lights

Garden of Lights

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Then, contrary to popular belief – proof that I’m on the “Nice” list!!

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A Christmas decorating contest at work brought out some holiday creativity.

The Winner!  And yes, this was my row!  Woot!

The Winner! And yes, this was my row! Woot!

Bumbles bounce!!

Bumbles bounce!!

Weirdos in the Christmas Village!

Weirdos in the Christmas Village!

SANTA!!!  I KNOW HIM!!!

SANTA!!! I KNOW HIM!!!

And then we had the first annual Conard Cookie Baking Expedition.

The calm before the storm.

The calm before the storm.

In the midst of 200 cut outs...

In the midst of 200 cut outs…

Niece Rachael, my mom, sisters Terri, Celeste and Maribeth.  Looking at my mom you are all realizing the apple does not fall far from the tree.

Niece Rachael, my mom, sisters Terri, Celeste and Maribeth. Looking at my mom you are all realizing the apple does not fall far from the tree.

Same people, minus Terri but plus me!  We had a great time!

Same people, minus Terri but plus me! We had a great time!

And finally – Christmas Eve mass with my dad, while my mom sang in the choir.

Yes, I know it's crooked.  Couldn't get a straight picture for some reason.  User error I am sure!

Yes, I know it’s crooked. Couldn’t get a straight picture for some reason. User error I am sure!

May you all enjoy the rest of your holiday season!  I will see you all again next week!

Sue

 

LBCOT 2


As promised, here is the 2nd installment of bicycle safety (see the first post – Let’s Be Careful Out There).  And really, this list covers all types of physical activity – not just cycling.  I wasn’t too thrilled to write this post because I DON’T DO ANY OF THESE THINGS!  At least not consistently.  Any why?  For the same reason a lot of people don’t do them – because they require extra time and commitment in our already busy lives.

THE HARD STUFF

Yearly Physical:  Okay, I get it that most women do get yearlies, but usually only for the type involving stirrups (which don’t even have the decency to be attached to a horse. If I have to have my feet in stirrups, there better be a pony around somewhere).  How many of you get a full physical, including blood work and a mammogram or prostate check?  Does your doctor even know you exercise?  Have you specifically asked him/her to clear you for physical activity?  Yeah, me neither.  

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CPR:  Also known as Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation.  Most of us have seen someone perform CPR on TV, so we all have an ‘idea’ of how it’s supposed to be done.  On the ride I mentioned in my first post, there was a nurse certified in CPR on the ride, and she saved a life that night.  Had she not been there, would anyone else have had enough knowledge from “seeing it on TV” to save that life?  Probably not.  I plan on taking CPR classes this winter.  Heck, what else is there to do in Wisconsin when it’s 40 below?  I’m kind of scared and nervous, though, because it feels like a big responsibility.  So if anyone else wants to do it with me, let me know!  It’s always easier to do something hard with a friend.  Or, maybe misery truly does love company.

Gratuitous photo of Hugh Jackman because it's my blog. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images for People.com)

Gratuitous photo of Hugh Jackman because it’s my blog.
(Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images for People.com)

First Aid:  Pretty much the same thing as CPR, but without all the scary parts.  Like, it would be way easier to learn how to apply pressure to a wound or squirt some Bactine on a knee scrape, than to do chest compressions and mouth to mouth.  Unless it was Johnny Depp or George Clooney, in which case mouth to mouth might not be THAT scary.  Still, should someone break a leg, step on a nail, wonk their head, or poke their eye out with the scissors you told them not to run with, you would be very glad you knew the basics of first aid.

Dug

Diet:  I think this is the hardest one.  We have access to and ingest so much crap, it’s unbelievable.  Donuts, bacon, ice cream, potato chips, cake, candy bars, french fries, quarter pounders, fried chicken, pizza.  Don’t like veggies?  Wrap them in bacon!  Pour cheese on them!  Add more bacon!  And if that’s not enough, let’s deep fry those suckers.  Oh, and these Twinkies need some doctoring up – chuck them in that deep fryer while you’re at it.  And add more bacon.  Our arteries would cry if anything could fit thru them anymore.  America does not understand “in moderation”.  Just take a look at the size of Texas  and our 15 trillion dollars of debt.  But I can make difference in my own little world, and eat more veggies, fruit, lean meats and whole grains.   And my body will thank me by continuing to function as the highly trained athletic body it is…  BAH HAHAHAHAHHAAA.  Okay, it will thank me by hopefully not collapsing during a burpee.

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Rest:  As much as I love to work out (cough, cough), my body needs at least one or two rest days a week.  Lately, that hasn’t been an issue with the cooler weather and less available light after work for biking.  But sometimes in spring and summer, I forget that my body might just need a break, and skipping a day of intense exercise won’t cause my fat cells to throw a frat party.  It just means I will regenerate and heal, allowing me to become stronger.  Rest includes getting sufficient amounts of sleep, and for night owls like me, this is  a challenge of Goliath proportions.  Seriously.  If I start going to bed before 11 each night, check the skies for the horses of the apocalypse.  Which is exactly why God invented “naps”.  Getting enough rest also means I will be less prone to injury, less likely to nod off while riding my bike, thus pedaling over a cliff like a mindless lemming, and less addicted to the detrimental affects of low cash flow caused by excessive trips to Starbucks.

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And that’s it!  Of course, I might have missed something, so if you think of anything to add, please comment below!  I love to hear from you and always welcome your opinions and ideas.

Tune in next week for my 3 part series on a special guest!  No, he’s not Superman, but darn close!

Best,
Sue

Let’s Be Careful Out There


Today I want to talk to you about safety.  Primarily biking safety, but some of these can be applied to other outdoor activities and just life in general.  I decided to write this after a person on one of our bike club rides (I was not present but heard about it later) had a heart attack.  They called an ambulance, but it took what seemed like an eternity to arrive, and in the meantime, the man quit breathing.  One of the riders was a nurse, thank God, and she performed CPR until the ambulance came.  He is thankfully okay, but he needed bypass surgery.

Now, it’s not that this person was being unsafe, but it made me start thinking about it because what if there had not been anyone on the ride who knew CPR?  And what if it had been a bike crash instead of a heart attack?  Or accident a car or truck?  According to bicyclinginfo.org, there were 677 bicyclist deaths and 38,000 bicycling related accidents in 2011.  These are just the reported cases, and actual figures are much higher.  Interestingly enough, 80% of those injured were male, so maybe the best advice I can give you is “Don’t be a man”….HA!  So what can we do to reduce the risk of becoming a statistic?

THE EASY STUFF

Helmet: WEAR ONE.  End of discussion.

Okay, not the end of the discussion (you knew it was too good to be true).  Seriously – God gave you ONE HEAD.  Notice he gave you two eyes, two arms, two legs, etc.  If He only gives you ONE of something, it might be a good idea to protect it.  So use your head, and wear your helmet.  Sure, you might look like a dork, but remember – Pride goeth before a fall – Proverbs 16:18.  See, it’s biblical.  WEAR. A. HELMET.

HELMETS!  (Francois Lenoir/Reuters)

HELMETS!
(Francois Lenoir/Reuters)

Mirror:  There are a lot of great gadgets to buy for your bike (trust me, I have most of them) and it can be difficult to decide which one is worth your hard-earned cash.  A rearview mirror costs about 20 bucks, and it could very well save your life, so it’s pretty easy to justify this investment.  Of course, for it to be effective, it means you need to actually use it.  Which brings me to my next item…

Cannondale

Look at all the crap on this bike. Notice especially the rearview mirror and the blinky light – two things I would keep over all the rest.

Pay Attention:  Look ahead and around you  for any possible issues like gravel, pot holes, or dogs.  Look behind you for cars and other riders (using your rearview mirror, of course!).  And if you ride with music, please consider unplugging, especially when riding on the road.  Remember the head God gave you – the one you have your helmet on?  Well, it’s full of sensory organs to help save your life and if one of them is getting blasted with music, then you can’t hear the impatient jerk in the truck behind you revving his engine, who will then scream past you, spitting out gravel, mud, beer cans, and language that would make a sailor blush.

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Bicyclists vs Drivers – butting heads since the dawn of time.
Photo courtesy of eta.co.uk

Use A Blinky:  A “blinky”, not a “blanky”.  Although there are days I wish I still had a “blanky”.  Anyway, a “blinky” is a blinky light.  Usually clear or red, attached to your bike and/or helmet (currently residing ON YOUR HEAD) and has a variety of settings ranging from constant, to strobe, to chase, etc.  If you can only afford one, get a decent one for the back of your bike.  If you can afford more, then get a small one for your helmet and one for the front of your bike as well.

Be Seen:  Besides your blinky, you can add to your visibility by wearing bright clothing.  This is a no brainer for exhibitionists like me, but others may not be as comfortable wearing neon.  It helps if yellow is your favorite color.  Or you’re in a wedding party.  Or a middle-aged gang.  

Obey Traffic Laws:  It’s very tempting for cyclists to invent their own rules on the road, feeding the road rage fire between cyclists and motorists.   A small list of common infractions include blowing thru intersections, swerving around cars at a stop light, riding against traffic, crossing the road at a non-intersection, etc.  WE HAVE ALL DONE THESE THINGS!  And one day, it’s going to bite one of us in the ass.  As much as I would like a reduction in the size of my ass, I don’t think I want the surgery done by a motor vehicle.  

Road ID:There’s a great company out there called Road ID where you can purchase a wrist or ankle band that lists your pertinent info, ICE (In Case of Emergency) contacts, and medical history.  It’s pretty cool, comes in fun colors, and it’s fairly inexpensive.  When an emergency occurs, others either won’t feel comfortable or won’t have time to dig thru your belongings for your health history and emergency contacts.  If it’s on your wrist or your ankle, the people who need it will find it.  I just got mine the other day, in fact!  And promptly forgot it on my bike ride tonight.  Geez Louise.

Road ID

Road ID. Get yours at http://www.roadid.com

Ride Together:  If you are riding with someone and something happens, there is someone to laugh at you and pull you out of the pickers.  Or maybe dial 911.  You know.  Whatever.  Besides, what are you – a hermit?  The most fun I have had riding has always been when riding with others.  

Let Others Know Your Route:  When your riding solo, be sure to leave knowledge of your route with someone else.  If you don’t show up for work the next day, someone at least knows where to start looking.  Scary to think about, but you need to think about it.  I usually ride one of three routes when I ride alone – I like them and they’re easy for Dave to remember.  There are also wonderful tools out there that allow you to map your rides and give them names.  You can simply tell someone “I am riding Route Q on MapMyRide” and give them access to your account.  Easy peasy.

That’s it for The Easy Stuff.  My next post will involve The Hard Stuff and I don’t mean moonshine, people.  I mean the stuff that needs extra time and commitment, and is often ignored because people just don’t want to do it.

Until next time – Let’s be careful out there!
Sue

Riding the Door, Less is More


As I sit down to type this, the air outside is a brisk 53 degrees, and it will be in the low forties by the time I walk out the door for work tomorrow.  Cooler air and shorter days herald the coming of fall, and I am feeling kinda bummed that I don’t have many more days of cycling left.  In fact, I had my last major bike event a couple of weeks ago riding in the  Door County Century.

Murphy Park Door County Century

Door County Century. First rest stop at Murphy Park. Gorgeous morning! Couldn’t ask for better weather.

The Door County Century celebrated its 35th anniversary this year, and is one of the most popular century rides in Wisconsin.  For good reason – they are well-organized, the routes wind thru some of the most beautiful countryside in Northeast Wisconsin, and the rest stops are well stocked with yummy delicious go-go fuel.  And you know me – it’s all about the food.

For those of you who are not crazy cyclists, a century is a 100 mile bike ride.  Most organized centuries are recreational and offer shorter routes in addition to the full 100 mile route.  This year, the DCC also had options of 28, 50, and 70.  Last year Kay and I did the full century.  It was really a lot of fun, but it was also very hilly and the final 30 miles were pretty tough.  “Pretty tough” meaning we were DYING and every time we saw another hill coming up we thought we were going to have a nervous breakdown.

Neither one of us felt like we had ridden enough this year to tackle those upper peninsula miles where the highest elevations await the unwary, so we opted for 70 this year.  Yes, we wimped out.  Totally.  But we are all good with that, because 70 was the Golden Ticket.

First of all, look at this map.  Check out those elevations between the yellow stars on the elevation map (in the boxed in area of the physical map) – all residing in the 100 mile route.  That’s a whole lotta pain right there.  A Polygon of Pain.

DCC1

Whereas the 70 mile route is all rainbows and unicorns, pretzels and cheese, donuts and muffins, pickles and cheesecurds…   The only thing we had to give up was strawberry shortcake at the Sister Bay rest stop.  That was almost a deal breaker until we realized we would actually finish this year before the beer ran out.  Although ironically, we didn’t even use our beer tickets, because we knew we had to drive home yet.  See?  I, too, can be a responsible adult.

Cave Point Door County Century

Cave Point Door County Century

I think my favorite part of this years ride was the Cave Point rest stop.  The sky was the bluest of blues and the grass was the greenest of greens.  Warm sun, a light breeze, the waves crashing below on the rocks, ham sandwiches…did I mention that I ride for food?  Kay and I stretched out in the sun for a while, but we were starting to feel a little nappish so figured we better get going.  It was truly hard to leave.

The next 15 miles roll thru lush forest and farm land, with enough variety to help wear off that ham sandwich and granola bar you just ate.  You can keep a fairly decent pace here, but oddly there is a rest stop only 6 miles from the finish.  You may be tempted to pass this one by, but you will miss cheesecurds and pickles if you do.  Oh yeah, there’s some lighthouse or something that’s supposed to have historical value or whatever.  Blah, blah, blah.  I never made it past the curd table.  And I know some of you are wondering about the pickles.  Like, why are there pickles at a rest stop, which is kind of what I thought too, but man – when your body is sodium deprived – that will be the best pickle you have ever eaten.

Wether you ride the 100, 70 or 50, the last 5 miles of this ride last an eternity, and you will really appreciate those cheese curds and pickles from that last stop.  It doesn’t help that there is one last beastly hill in the home stretch.  Seriously, who plans a route where they stick a giant hill in the last mile?  Kinda makes you want to smack someone with your water bottle, but then your turning the corner into the fair grounds and you can hear the music and smell the garlic bread, and you know there is a piece of Door County cherry pie with your name on it.  And beer.  Which you may or may not drink, depending on your responsibility ratio.  I know, you can’t all be me – such perfection is truly hard to maintain.  I struggle but I do it for you little people.

All kidding aside: If you enjoy organized rides, put the Door County Century on your bucket list.  It’s offering of beauty, challenge, camaraderie, and of course great food, make this ride worth your time and cash.  Hope to see you there next year!

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Drafting Behind God


Drafting: to ride close behind another bike so as to benefit from the reduction in air pressure created behind the bike ahead.

I learned the basics of drafting while cycling last year from my friend Kay. It was a true case of the blind leading the blind, but we got the gist of it. I am not sure what surprised me more – that it worked or that I did it without crashing into her because I was following about 4 inches from her back tire. Afterwards, I went home and read a few articles on it (thus making me an ‘expert’) and learned there is a long stretch of beneficial air flow, and in the future I could follow at a safer distance. Practice makes perfect, and now I can recognize that sweet spot behind a rider much quicker. I usually feel a little guilty (Catholic girl problems) because I am leeching off the person in front, even though I know my turn pulling is coming up.

A couple of weeks ago I rode in the Ganther Race the Lake around Lake Winnebago. This is a 90 mile race – not a ride. Normally I take part in ‘rides’ which are not timed and nobody is trying to win, so this had a much different feel to it. There were waves of riders tiered on speed, with the élite riders first and the slowest riders last. I signed up with Kay, who had done this race last year, and we lied a teensy bit about our normal ‘average’ pace to get in a faster wave because last year Kay found she was dodging slower riders and had a harder time finding people to draft with.

This was my first bike race and I was pretty nervous. During the weeks earlier I wasted a lot of energy worrying about finishing on time and trying to devise a plan of action to make sure I finished in the allotted 8.5 hours. Kay assured me we would have plenty of time and she was right. It was finally our turn and we set off at a brisk 20 mph pace in our pack of 100+ riders. I found it was surprisingly easy to keep up that speed with so many riders drafting together, and we rocked the first 45 miles in two and a half hours, including one rest stop. It was a huge, exhilarating, bike vortex that just sucked us along, leaving us grinning and confident at the mid point High Cliff rest stop. I felt so…professional.

Unfortunately, the second half had higher elevations (the first being High Cliff Park’s mammoth hill) and it started out with me losing my chain and falling over in my clips (totally embarrassing – so much for my pro career). Because of the hilly terrain, we lost our ‘pack’ and the miles were a lot slower and harder without the momentum of drafting. However, we finished with an overall time of 6 hours and 15 minutes, and I was pretty happy with that (even though they were out of beer by then), considering how worried I was that it was going to take me the entire eight and a half hours.

I posted this vision of loveliness right after we finished Race the Lake.  Obviously I was delusional.  Notice how my hair molded to the vents in my helmet.  Not my best look.

I posted this vision of loveliness on Facebook right after we finished Race the Lake. Obviously I was delusional. Notice how my hair molded to the vents in my helmet. Not my best look.

Drafting is a principle I wish I could apply more often in my spiritual life as well. If I could follow God more closely and let him pull me along, life would be a little easier I think. I could catch my breath, check out the scenery, grab a drink. Maybe even have a conversation with him that didn’t start with “Lord, I’m in a pickle…”

Most times I am off on my own route, going uphill against a 50 mph wind, and then it starts to rain and my chain falls off and I get a flat tire and tip over in my clips, all while a manure truck flies past spraying me with gravel and poop spores. Poop spores are the worst.

Thankfully, God always comes back for me. He’s my spiritual SAG wagon. He fixes my tire, puts my chain back on and shields me from the next inevitable poop wagon. I keep telling myself I am going to try harder to keep my line behind the Lord but trying is not the same as doing (“Do or do not. There is no try.” – Yoda). I’m like my dog Daisy – easily distracted by the squirrels around me and getting my undies in a bundle about the dog next door. I can’t stay mad at her though even if it’s 3am and she won’t get her barking butt back in the house, and I guess God can’t stay mad at me either. Maybe cuz I’m just so darn cute.

How can I stay mad a this face?

How can I stay mad a this face?

Joy


Tonight I sit at my computer, enjoying the final hours of a sunny day, sleepy and sunburned.  I started my day with church in my bike clothes, leaving right after to meet up with Kay for our first ‘real’ bike outing of the year.  We had taken a couple of chilly rides in the earlier weeks of April, but rides with booties, hats and gloves just aren’t the same.  Today, we finally had seventies, short sleeves,  and sun.  As we rode out Willow Road, a single word sang in my head – finally, after a long winter – JOY.

Joy is elusive, isn’t it?  It’s hard finding it at times.  I know the technical ‘rule’ about joy – that you can’t tie it to your feelings, that it needs to be a state of being.  However, practicing joy and achieving joy are not always inclusive and doggone it, sometimes you need a day in the sun.

BOOYAH

BOOYAH!

Our first jaunt was not remarkable from a distance standpoint – just 20 miles – but we

Old Glory Honor Flight

Kay, Adrian and me, at the Eaton Town Hall. Handsome old guy with two hot chicks. And look, we match!

stopped off at Eaton Town Hall for a bowl of booyah to support the Old Glory Honor Flight, and met a Korean war veteran who was able to participate this year.  His name is Adrian Cherney, and he also used to bike, so we had a lot to talk about.  He only just quit riding last year – I think he is around 85 so that is a lot of years of riding.  The booyah was awesome and my only regret is not being able to buy any to bring home.  Kay and I decided we should make a habit of planning our weekend rides around local booyah picnics.  I may need to have Dave build me a booyah wagon so I can haul ice cream tubs of it home.

Lily Lake, WI

It’s an aerator folks! Pay no attention to the aliens!

On the way out, we stopped at Lily Lake just to be nosy and to add a few extra miles to our ride.  There we found this thing (see pic) – no clue what it was at the time so Kay snapped a picture of it to show her hubby, and we have since found out it is an aerator.  As I told Kay, it’s good to know what it is, because you never know when that information might come in handy, and someone may say to you, “What is that thing?  Is that an alien ship crash landed in Lily Lake?” and you can say, “Why no, that is an aerator!”.  Mystery solved!  No need to hide the women and children!

After I got home, I spent more time in the sun playing with the dogs, weeding my flower beds and other such nonsense.  It was a glorious cherry on top of a chocolate sundae weekend.

A few other weekend highlights:  Hanging out with Dawn on Saturday and getting some time to visit that didn’t involve work or working out, and roller skating at St. Mary’s Roller Rink for the first time since I was probably 13 years old on Saturday night, courtesy of my friend Amanda and her children’s 9th birthday (Happy Birthday Evan and Abby!).  I also upgraded my blog site so I can now upload VIDEOS!  See below for actual footage of my roller skating experience (notice I remained upright during the entire 20 seconds).

Have a great week!

Sue